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Happy New Year everyone! (I know it’s a little late to say that, but given that this the first news update of 2017, I figured why not). Rebecca was featured in yesterday’s edition of The Times–promoting the upcoming UK release of Christine and sharing some insight on dementia, which her father, Sir Peter Hall, was diagnosed with several years ago.

THE TIMES – ‘I have melancholy resting face,” the actress Rebecca Hall, 34, says, apologising. It’s true that her angular face — which has been compared to a Modigliani painting — can look severe in repose. However, when larking about, she looks like a beautiful tomboy.

There’s also a new glow of happiness, which she puts down to life with her new husband, the American actor Morgan Spector (whom viewers of Boardwalk Empire will know as Frank Capone). Hall never thought she would get married and swore she would never date an actor. After years of a peripatetic actor’s life, though, she has finally put down roots. They married in New York in September 2015. Home is now Brooklyn with Spector and their two cats, Max and Viv. “It’s so unfair when people talk about crazy cat ladies. I know plenty of men who have cats. My husband got me into cats and I love them so much.”

The marriage took everybody by surprise. Many people seemed to think that Hall was still with the British director Sam Mendes. After Mendes’s six-year marriage to Kate Winslet broke up in 2010, Hall was forced to deny that she and Mendes, a close friend, were in a relationship.

They had worked together intensively on the Bridge Project for which Mendes took Shakespeare and Chekhov around the globe using a British/American company that included Ethan Hawke and Simon Russell Beale (with Hall cast as Varya in The Cherry Orchard and Hermione in The Winter’s Tale). The rumours went away, but quietly, a year after his divorce, they got together.

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Labels: Articles and Interviews, Photo Updates, Photoshoots

THE WRAP – “Christine” chronicles the mental struggles of television reporter Christine Chubbuck, who shot herself during a live broadcast in 1974. But actress Rebecca Hall, who is riveting as Chubbuck in the dark drama from director Antonio Campos, says that’s not all the film has to offer — it also highlights the overall issue of mental health.

“I think that the film does something really good for society,” Hall told TheWrap. “People have come up to me and said, “Thank you for making this film,’ or in tears about the effect it’s had on them, which makes me proud that it exists.”

“I want people to go see it because there is a misunderstanding that this will be a horribly depressing movie about someone who can’t get out of bed — that’s a misconception about depression. Often, people with depression are engaged in a very active fight to live. And that’s what you are witnessing. It’s disturbing, yes, but it doesn’t make you flatline.”

Hall only had about 15 minutes of footage of Chubbuck to study during her preparation for the film, but she said the lack of first-hand material didn’t hamper her. “The truth is, there isn’t really anyone who doesn’t have someone in their circle who is affected by mental health issues,” she said.

“So it’s not like I didn’t have things to draw on.”

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Labels: Articles and Interviews, Christine, Photo Updates, Photoshoots, Projects

Rebecca is featured as part of the Best Movies and Performances of 2016 feature for DuJour–and I’ve uploaded the gorgeous new photoshoot to the gallery. In case you can’t tell, I’m kind of in love with these photos.

DUJOUR – “I think that if anyone looks at Christine from a distance and goes, ‘Oh how fascinating, how macabre,’ it’s dangerous. Even though she is an unusual character who did a shocking thing [the newscaster shot herself on air], it was a statement that came out of deep pain and suffering. It’s unthinkable in the abstract, but I think the film allows you access to try and understand how she could have gotten to that point. It walks alongside her and observes her, but also allows space for everything that can never be known about anyone. To me, Christine feels like a sort of harbinger of a lot of things we talk about now, whether it’s mental health issues or suicide. And the biggest tragedy for me is that, for all of her constant self-monitoring and her performance of how she thinks she will be acceptable in the world, she is actually loved by the people around her. But she can’t see that, and doesn’t feel like she will ever be understood by anyone.”

Labels: Articles and Interviews, Christine, Photo Updates, Photoshoots, Projects

I’ve updated the gallery with outtakes and scans of Rebecca’s striking cover photoshoot for AMAZING–a quarterly fashion and culture magazine. She looks incredible, right? I’ve managed to transcribe part of the interview, which can be read below. In it Rebecca discusses her role in Christine, her favorite books and authors, and her childhood.

Born in London to Sir Peter Hall, the British stage director and founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, and to American opera singer Maria Ewing, it comes as no surprise that Hall has pursued an accomplished acting career across film and stage.

There is one prismatic quality to Hall’s eclectic body of work, one where openness and curious instinct has led to roles which traverse a wide and colorful spectrum of emotion and genre. In 2010, Hall won the BAFTA TV Award for her work in Paul Garland’s miniseries Red Riding, and her turn in Woody Allen’s Vicky Cristina Barcelona saw her nominated for a Golden Globe Award. She has inhabited an array of characters – having played a jet-set girlfriend in Frost/Nixon, an author proving supernatural hoaxes in the ghost story The Awakening, and a scientist in the blockbuster Iron Man 3.

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Labels: Articles and Interviews, Magazine Scans, Photo Updates, Photoshoots

What a great photoshoot and interview this is! Rebecca is featured on the latest issue of TANK, the quarterly British magazine which features everything from fashion to architecture. I’ve added photos of the shoot as well as the cover of the issue to the gallery. I’ll do my best to feature further coverage as soon as possible.

TANK – Rebecca Hall is watching herself on film, running the same sequence over and over, analysing tiny details of her own expressions and gestures. “Do you think that feels forced?” she asks a colleague. This isn’t the Rebecca Hall we’ve seen before, though. It’s the opening sequence of Antonio Campos’ Christine, in which she plays the brilliant, ambitious and witty television journalist Christine Chubbuck, whose personal and professional troubles permanently overshadowed her gifts when, one day in 1974, she looked straight to camera from behind the anchor’s desk and announced to viewers that “In keeping with Channel 40’s policy of bringing you the latest in blood and guts, and in living colour, you are going to see another first: attempted suicide,” – and then shot herself in the head.

To kill oneself on live television seems both a radically unambiguous gesture and an irreducibly mysterious one. Rumoured to have inspired Paddy Chayefsky during the writing of Network (or at least eerily echoing its conceit), Chubbuck’s act could be read, Hall says when I meet her, as “symbolically, the primal scream” of an America suffering a national nervous breakdown. If it was an act of satire – as well as an expression of profound despair – it was one utterly lost on the media it was aimed at: Chubbuck’s boss, Robert Nelson, who so angered her with his demands for gory or sensational stories over the more serious work she preferred, reportedly showed off his press clippings about her suicide with the words, “We got the whole front page.”

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Labels: Magazine Alerts, Photo Updates, Photoshoots

I’ve added a gorgeous new shot of Rebecca taken at the Cannes Film Festival-where she has been promoting The BFG. Both the photocall and premiere for the film took place earlier today, and I’ll be adding photos from both events tomorrow. For now, enjoy this great photo!

Labels: Photo Updates, Photoshoots

W MAGAZINE – When 34-year-old Rebecca Hall first came to the Cannes Film Festival in 2008 for Woody Allen’s Vicky Cristina Barcelona (in which she played Vicky), she didn’t even bring a dress to walk the carpet. “It was the first red carpet I had ever done, and when I got to Cannes and was like ‘wow, this is a huge thing…’ but I learned from my mistake!” quips Hall, whose saving grace was Alberta Ferretti, who came to the rescue at the last minute. With that behind her, the BAFTA-winning actress returns to the Grand Palais tonight, fully equipped in Dior Couture to walk the red carpet for her film The BFG, Steven Spielberg’s remake of Roald Dahl’s 1982 childhood classic. Shot in Vancouver, the film follows an orphan named Sophie who teams up with the Big Friendly Giant to defend the world against evil people-eating giants. Hall plays Mary, the Queen of England’s maid, who comes to Sophie’s rescue. Here, Hall talks everything from magical moments with Spielberg, to bonding with her eleven-year-old co-star.

The film is part animated, and part real life. How long did you spend talking to a green screen?
None actually! Towards the end of the film the green screen stops and it takes place at Buckingham Palace with the Queen of England and real people… and I’m one of the real people. I had to look at Mark Rylance, who plays the BFG, on a platform in a monster suit. For Mark it must have been incredibly alien. He was way up there isolated on this platform. In the digital version he looks like a giant.

And had you read The BFG before you were cast for the role?
Yes, I loved it. I read it when I was 5, when I had just graduated to reading by myself in my head. I remember it was a big moment for me.

Well nearly thirty years later you’re part of its legacy! Talk about the character you play.
The character I play is Mary, a quite rotund, fleshy maid with a feather duster. It’s really cartoonish. When I first read the script, I was like, “they want me for that role?” But they changed it a bit to make her the Queen’s right hand woman, who runs her life, which is fun and quite a nice plot twist.

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Labels: Articles and Interviews, Photo Updates, Photoshoots

Rebecca is featured in the latest issue of Interview–and in addition to a new interview, she looks strikingly beautiful in this black and white photoshoot taken for the magazine. If you haven’t already, you can read the full interview below–where Rebecca discusses her current role in The Gift, as well as her challenging potrayal of news reporter Christine Chubbuck, in Christine, which is due for release at some point next year. Enjoy!

INTERVIEW – If you meet Rebecca Hall, she might ask you about your family history. “It’s always something I do when I meet people,” she says with a laugh. “Alright, tell me about your family, what’s the deal?” Though she’s just one in a household full of performers (her mother is an opera singer, her father a director, and her half-siblings scattered across a variety of theater and film disciplines), she’s adamant that most families have as intriguing a story to tell as hers. (She concedes that hers is “more externally colorful.”) She mentions Sarah Polley’s recent documentary Stories We Tell by way of example—the film is premised on the idea that every family has its own story.

Her excitement about family narratives is part of a deeper cultural curiosity—she’s also a self-professed music nerd (currently deciding whether she likes Chilly Gonzales’s latest effort) and a consumer of films of all descriptions. She’s hard-pressed to pick a favorite genre, even. “I’m a fan, at the end of the day,” she says. “I’m a real geek in this department.” She tosses out a list of what she watches regularly, from Golden Age American films to French cinema, to the latest blockbusters, comedies, and drama, foreign and domestic alike. Her openness to experience also defines her choices of roles. This year alone, she appears in the upcoming Steven Spielberg-directed adaptation of Roald Dahl’s The BFG, the Antonio Campos biopic Christine about a young Floridian newscaster who committed suicide on live television, and Joel Edgerton’s The Gift, a psychological thriller in the purest sense of the term.

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Labels: Articles and Interviews, Photo Updates, Photoshoots
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